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LANDac Conference 2019

LANDac Annual International Conference 2019

Please register here!

LAND GOVERNANCE IN TRANSITION:

How to support transformations that work for people and nature?
July 4 – 5, 2019
Muntgebouw Utrecht, the Netherlands

The LANDac Annual International Conference “Land governance in transition” will take place on July 4 and 5, 2019 in Utrecht. It offers a podium for researchers, practitioners and private sector representatives interested in land governance for equitable and sustainable development. The 2019 Conference looks at land governance through the lens of transformations.

Pre-conference side-events

On the 3rd of July several pre-conference side-events take place. Pre-conference side-events are free of charge, yet places are limited. Priority will be given to those who have registered for the LANDac Annual International Conference 2019.

Deadlines for registration have been extended until June 15th!

More information on the side-events:

The LANDac Annual International Conference 2019 Edition

Central questions revolve around the long-term dynamics around land, water and food production. How is land governance itself transformed, as it seeks to respond to changing circumstances? And how is learning and knowledge building about these dynamics developing, what are promising concepts and tools? Particular questions relate to the different aspects of land governance, such as gender, food security, land tenure security, investments, conflict prevention and peace-building. In a fast-paced world of short-term projects and funding, how can we learn from past and current transitions, build sustainable partnerships and networks, and allow for seeds of innovation to bear fruit?

This conference builds on nine years of LANDac Annual International Conferences where rural land debates were connected to the urban agenda, where land governance from an SDG starting point were explored, and where its role in issues of mobility, migration and displacement was examined . The 2019 Conference builds on these discussions to return to core questions about land governance and transformation.

Key note speakers

Prof. Pauline Peters 
Sr. Research Fellow – Centre
for International Development,
Harvard University
Dr. Lorenzo Cotula 
Principal researcher – IIED
Fridah Githuku 
Executive Director – GROOTS
Kenya
Denis Kabiito 
CEO/National coordinator– UNYFA (National Federation of
Ugandan Farmers)
Dr. Eugene Chigbu 
Research Scientist – TU Munich & GLTN Training and Research Cluster Lead
Raul Socrates 
National Coordinator – PAKISAMA
National Confederation and
Movement of Peasant
Organizations
Dr. Cecilia Tacoli 
Principal researcher – IIED

Register now for the LANDac Annual International Conference 2019!

Conference themes 2019

Based on the received session proposals, LANDac presents seven conference themes for 2019:

  1. Inclusive Land Governance: Gender and Migration
  2. Urban Land Dynamics, Infrastructure and Deltas
  3. Community Rights: Climate Change and Natural Resource Management
  4. Realities of Dispossession, Displacement and Resettlement
  5. Land Governance and Agribusiness
  6. Land Governance in Practice: Approaches and Tools
  7. Land Governance and New Technologies

Below is an overview of all conference sessions, categorized according to the conference themes. Please click on a theme to be directed to the session descriptions.

• Mobility and Land Governance in Africa: Making the Connections Work for Inclusive Development
• Building Land Governance Towards Effective and Inclusive Transformation – from discourse to practice in Women’s Land Rights
• Policy advocacy for women’s land rights: strategies and experiences

• Understanding and Influencing the Dynamics of Food and Water Systems in Delta Regions of the Global South
• Spatial Injustice in Urban Land Markets in East Africa: What is the Evidence?
• Urban land debates in the global South: enclosure and recommoning
• The Urban Land Nexus and Inclusive Urbanization in Africa
• Dutch Diamonds in the Delta: Towards inclusive and climate proof delta planning in the Global South

• Community Forest Rights: What are the key conditions for success?
• Farmer and Indigenous: Access to land and territory in South America, 21st century
• Building land and natural resources management governance at community level in Mozambique
• Transforming pastoralist landscapes: the importance of inclusive land management, policy engagement and climate risk management

• Accumulation by dispossession. Dynamics of large-scale land acquisition, agro-industrial crops and Special Economic Zones.
• Increasing Farmland Concentration in Central and Eastern Europe – Causes, Challenges, Consequences
• Beyond the ‘conflict-fetish’ – land disputes and structural agrarian questions
• Displacement, dispossession and defence strategies around land
• When do displacement and resettlement end? The temporalities of dislocation, socio-political engagement, and sustainable development
• Land rights; expropriation and compensation. Recent advances, insights and implementation tools
• Everyday experiences of ‘development’ and ‘dispossession’: understanding longer-term impacts of megaprojects

• Cooperation and Conflict in Inclusive Agribusiness: The impacts of Chain Integration on Food Security and Local Development
• For better or worse: Agri-food systems transforming land governance needs and outcomes
• The roles of interdisciplinary research in sustainability transition of palm oil production
• The future of agriculture: land and (food) production in a context of climate change in sub-Saharan Africa

• Facilitating transition: how to enable inclusive land governance change and why it matters
• Multi-Stakeholders Platforms: a Transformational Arena for Fostering and Scaling-Up Local Innovation
• Actor perspectives on landscape scenarios: Linking sectors through integrated landscape governance for people and nature
• Land & The Role of the State: Increasing Transparency and Accountability
• Dynamics of Due Dilligence: Conditions for Responsible Land Based Investment
• Geo-information management for land administration: innovation, transitions and stability
• Land Governance, Administration and Law-making

• Uniting global and hyper-local data for land
• Land Lost In Translation: Interactive workshop
• New Responses to New Challenges: A Land Technology Sandbox

LANDac welcomes innovative and original ideas; if you have suggestions for materials to present or exhibit at the conference – such as short films, interactive websites, photos, posters – please contact the organisers at landac2019@gmail.com.

Register now for the LANDac Annual International Conference 2019!
Registration costs are €200 (€100 for BSc and MSc students upon proof of a valid student ID). The registration fee includes catering for two days. We regret that LANDac is unable to cover participant expenses.

We look forward seeing you in Utrecht this summer!

The Organising Committee
Bianca de Souza Nagasawa, MSc student at Utrecht Univsersity
Chantal Wieckardt, LANDac/Utrecht University
Christine Richter, ITC University of Twente
Gemma van der Haar, Wageningen University
Griet Steel, LANDac/Utrecht University
Guus van Westen, LANDac/Utrecht University
Imke Greven, Oxfam Novib
Marthe Derkzen, LANDac/Utrecht University
Niek Thijssen, Agriterra

To sign up to the LANDac mailing list, send an email to landac.geo@uu.nl. You will be kept up-to-date with happenings in the Netherlands land governance sphere, and specifically with LANDac events – including conference news.

Three things to know about women’s land rights today

This blog originally appeared on World Bank and on Stand4herland

By Anna Wellenstein and Victoria Stanley

Watch the video here

Gender equality is central to ongoing global efforts to reduce extreme poverty and improve livelihoods for all. An important part of gender equality is ensuring women’s equal access to – and secure rights to – land and properties.

Strengthening women’s land tenure security improves their rights and their dignity. Importantly, improving women’s access to and control over economic resources also has a positive effect on a range of development goals, including poverty reduction and economic growth.

What do we know about women’s land rights globally?

Although gains have been made to increase legal protections for women to use, manage, own and inherit land, in practice, women often aren’t able to realize their rights to the land on which they live, work and depend for survival.

In a video blog marking the International Day of Rural Women, World Bank Director of Strategy and Operations, Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience Global Practice Anna Wellenstein and Senior Land Administration Specialist Victoria Stanley discuss three “headlines” one may encounter on women and land:

  1. Globally, there is an understanding that reducing poverty requires secure land tenure, and that women’s share in that is important.
  2. Researchers and policymakers don’t have enough gender-disaggregated data at the country level to understand the true scope of the challenge of women’s land rights, but efforts are underway to collect more data and gain a better understanding.
  3. There are strong pilots and initiatives of women themselves to gain equal access to land and improve tenure security, but now these efforts need to go to scale.

To drive broader development impact and affect lasting change, the World Bank joins global and regional partners – Landesa, Global Land Tool Network (GLTN), UN-Habitat, Habitat for Humanity, and the Huairou Commission – and local women and communities in preparing an advocacy campaign that aims to close the gap between law and practice on women’s land rights.

For more visit:  blog series.

SUMMER SCHOOL ON RESEARCHING LAND GOVERNANCE AND LAND RELATIONS IN THE MEKONG REGION

The Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development<http://rcsd.soc.cmu.ac.th/home/> and the Mekong Land Research Forum<http://www.mekonglandforum.org/> will run a week-long intensive summer school on land research in the Mekong Region. Applications are welcome from early-career academics, government staff and those working with civil society organizations. The purpose of the summer school is to equip participants with a research orientation relevant to the challenges of land governance in the Mekong Region. A good working knowledge of the English language is required.

SCHOLARSHIPS are available for participants from Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam, covering travel and accommodation support. Participants from elsewhere (including Thailand and China) will need to fund their own travel and accommodation costs, but all tuition and meal costs will be provided without charge.

•       Summer school description, including provisional timetable: 2019 Mekong Land Governance summer school description

•       Details of information meetings around the region, to learn more from previous participants: Summer school 2019 – information meetings

The summer school Facebook page can be found here:

https://www.facebook.com/Summer-School-on-Mekong-Land-Relations-1680911415514382/

Realizing women’s land rights in Africa and Beyond – A Webinar Report

In October 2016, women farmers from 22 countries across Africa climbed the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro to claim women’s rights for access to and control over land and natural resources. This event coincided with the launch of a campaign of the African Land Policy Centre (ALPC) to reach the target of having 30 percent of all registered land in the name of women by 2025 and to embed women’s land rights into the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

In line with these initiatives, there has been increased attention for women’s land rights by grassroots movements, local governments, civil society organisations, academics, and international organisations. Nonetheless, despite progressive policies, legal frameworks, and strong civil society engagement in many countries, there is still a lot to be done to feel a real impact on the ground. This webinar featured experiences from several grassroots initiatives and highlighted how they fight for women’s improved access to and control over land and other natural resources and to scale up women’s land rights.

The webinar was co-hosted by Acção Académica Para O Desenvolvimento Das Comunidades Rurai (ADECRU) (Mozambique), Action Aid, Both ENDS, ENDA Pronat (Senegal), Fórum Mulher (Mozambique), GROOTS Kenya, LANDac, the Land Portal Foundation and OXFAM International.

Download the report here: Realizing Women’s Land Rights Report

Sustainable Palm Oil Dialogue – Europe

We are pleased to invite you to the dialogue on reaching complete market transformation to sustainable palm oil in 2020.

Taking place on Friday 14 June 2019, at the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht, this dialogue will debate how we can reach our 2020 target and formulate a Framework for Action through interactive discussion.

During the day, the European Palm Oil Alliance (EPOA), Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), and IDH, The Sustainable Trade Initiative will also each give updates on recent developments. The Amsterdam Declaration Partnership will give a briefing on their progress as well. Specifically, this day is developed for networking amongst our shared stakeholders. Be prepared for a lively debate!

The draft program is available here. Registration is free but space is limited, please register here before May 20 to avoid disappointment. Cancellations after 10 June will be subject to an automated charge of 50 euros for catering expenses.

For more information, please contact RSPO Europe: info.eu@rspo.org

Let People Protect Nature

A botto­m-up perspective on environmental conservation and local development in Costa Rica.

Country: Costa Rica

Date: 11-10-2018

OSA PENINSULA, COSTA RICA. In the existing contrast between environmental conservation and local development, local people are often not taken into account. However, The conciliation between these two lies upon the local people.

Sign of forested area benefitting fom Payment for Environmental Services in the RFGD

Living off the forest

Eulalio is waiting for me at the beginning of the path. He greets me with a smile as white and broad as his hat. We ride horseback for over an hour up in the primary rainforest; it’s still very early in the morning and the wildlife of the most biologically intense place on Earth surrounds us.

Suddenly the rainforest turns into grassland: 60 hectares clear-cut with chainsaw and fire. This area was way wider when in 1965 Eulalio’s family obtained rights to possess no-one’s land through deforestation and created their ranch. Now the whole area belongs to the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve (RFGD), a buffer protected area that surrounds the Corcovado National Park. Eulalio and his family live out of farming: rice, beans, cattle and few pigs. However, his livelihood has been notably affected by the Reserve’s regulation. «I cannot use my land the way I need it – he sighs – I left some area back to the forest, because it is not worth to work it anymore, but they [the Ministry of the Environment] pay me peanuts as compensation for forested land».

In the RFGD only a restricted range of extractive activities is allowed, limiting to a great extent economic possibilities; «If I leave any fallow land, I am not allowed to farm it anymore because they consider it as reforesting land. This way I have to keep it clear all the time and the soil loses nutrients and harvest is poor».

Many stories resemble Eulalio’s one. Traditional livelihoods in the Osa are based on natural resources exploitation, but they have been limited by environmental conservation. Those who possess land can play the card of (low)Payment for Environmental Services; those who do not have land or a land title often just bypass the law and base their livelihood on illegality.

Conservation VS development

Since the ‘70s, when protected areas was created in the Osa, local people have been displaced and/or limited in their economic activities. All this is happening in an area that has been traditionally affected by one of the lowest development levels in the country, namely for lack of economic opportunities, employment and public services. In its latest report, the Ministry of National Planning and Economic Policy classifies the Peninsula’s development index among the last quintile and shows a clear relation among protected areas and low development index. Is it then really impossible to reconcile environmental conservation and local development? Many attempts have been made in this direction, but the results have been alternate and the population often has not been actively involved.

Still, human activities are considered the main threat to the Peninsula’s biodiversity richness: urbanistic and touristic expansion go on runaway, forested areas are cut and cleared with fire to make space for monocultures namely oil palm. Animals are hunted illegally and gold mining activity is perpetrated within protected areas.

If it is certain that economic development entails trade-offs to environmental conservation, it is also true that lack of any economic alternative leads to illegal and unsustainable extractive activities.

Also, while environmental conservation in the Osa seems to be rooted both in governmental institutions and NGOs, this doesn’t seem to be the case of local development.

“Of course protecting Nature is important! But they get their pay check at the end of the month, while we are left with nothing”

Cut and burnt forest

Yield from oil plantation

Get to know the author:

After graduating in the Master in Sustainable Development/ID track Alice swung between her IDS studies and the belief that we should not only focus on developing countries but also on marginal areas of so-called developed ones. She just came back from one year in Northern Tanzania where she worked as project officer on a project focused on enhancing resilience of Maasai communities.

Click here for other IDS alumni blogs and experiences.

 

Looking into the Crystal Ball: Anticipating and Influencing Change in Asian Deltas – Prince Claus Chair Inaugural Lecture by Veena Srinivasan

Looking into the Crystal Ball: Anticipating and Influencing Change in Asian Deltas

Prof Veena Srinivasan has been appointed as the holder of the Prince Claus Chair in Development and Equity 2018-2020 at Utrecht University. On 7 May she will deliver her inaugural lecture, entitled: ‘Looking into the crystal ball: Anticipating and influencing change in Asian deltas’.

Srinivasan has been appointed to the Chair for her research into sustainable and inclusive food production in Asian delta regions. She is keen not only to contribute to delta and food research being conducted in Utrecht, but also to play a role in intensifying collaborations between Dutch and Indian institutions. She will engage in comparative research across delta regions within India (Ganges and Cauvery) and across Asia (Mekong and Indonesia).

Date: 7th May 2019, 16:15 – 18:15.

Location: University Hall (Academiegebouw), Domplein 29, Utrecht.

For more information, click here.

LAO PEOPLE’S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC

Statement by Professor Philip Alston, United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights on his visit to Lao PDR, 18-28 March 2019 Vientiane, 28 March 2019

On paper, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic has made great progress in poverty reduction over recent decades. And after more than twenty years of striving to graduate from “least developed country” (LDC) status, and maintaining GDP growth above 6.5 percent since 2005,1 the country is set to graduate in 2024.2 This impressive growth has been achieved in large part through encouraging foreign investment, particularly in mining, hydropower, and agriculture. However, behind this apparent success story lies a more complicated and problematic reality. Unlike in many countries, Lao PDR’s rapid economic growth has not led to a commensurate reduction in poverty. The Government’s single-minded focus on large infrastructure projects (such as dams and railways), land acquisition, resource extraction, and foreign investment has created all too few jobs for Lao people, generated very large debt repayment obligations, and disproportionately benefited wealthy elites. Those living in poverty, ethnic minorities, and people in rural areas have seen very few of the benefits of the economic boom.

Continue to read his end of mission statement here: End of Mission Statement

Other Materials:

Website

End of Mission Press Release

End of Mission Press Release in Lao

Video of Press Conference

Exploring the Nexus between Displacement and Land Administration: The Case of Rwanda

1Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Geo-Information Management, Faculty for Geo-Information Sciences and Earth Observation—ITC, University of Twente, Hengelosestraat 99, 7514 AE Enschede, The Netherland
2Department of Land Administration and Management, Institute of Applied Sciences, 155 Ruhengeri, Rwanda
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Published: 29 March 2019

Abstract

In conflict situations, many people are displaced because of hostility and arms in the area. Displaced people are forced to leave behind their properties, and this in turn interrupts the relationship between people and their land. The emergency period in particular has been identified as a weak point in the humanitarian response to land issues in post-conflict situations. In addition, during this period of response, most post-conflict governments do not prioritize land administration as an emergency issue due to other social, economic, security, and political challenges, which countries face in the immediate aftermath of the conflict. In the longer run, this results in post-conflict illegal land occupation, secondary occupation, numerous disputes and claims over land, and dysfunctional government institutions that legalize these illegal and secondary occupations. This research explores the nexus between displacement and land administration in a post-conflict context. It uses empirical data from fieldwork in Rwanda, and discusses how government interventions in land administration in emergency and early recovery periods of post-conflict situations affect future land administration during the reconstruction phase. The post-conflict Rwandan government envisaged proper land administration as a contributor to sustainable peace and security as it enhances social equity and prevents conflicts. Thus, it embarked on a nationwide systematic land registration program to register land all over the country with the aim of easing land administration practices and reducing successive land-related claims and disputes. However, the program faced many challenges, among which were continuous land claims and disputes. Our research anticipates these continued land claims and disputes are due to how land issues were handled in the emergency and early recovery period of the post-conflict Rwanda, especially during land sharing initiatives and Imidugudu (collective settlement policy).

Rent-Seeking Practices, Local Resource Curse, and Social Conflict in Uganda’s Emerging Oil Economy

Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, 9712 CP Groningen, The Netherlands
Published: 27 March 2019

Abstract

We consider the different types of rent-seeking practices in emerging oil economies, and discuss how they contribute to social conflict and a local resource curse in the Albertine Graben region of Uganda. The rent-seeking activities have contributed to speculative behavior, competition for limited social services, land grabbing, land scarcity, land fragmentation, food insecurity, corruption, and ethnic polarization. Local people have interpreted the experience of the consequent social impacts as a local resource curse. The impacts have led to social conflicts among the affected communities. Our research used a range of methods, including 40 in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation, and document analysis. We argue there is an urgent need by all stakeholders—including local and central governments, oil companies, local communities, and civil society organizations—to address the challenges before the construction of oil infrastructure. Stakeholders must work hard to create the conditions that are needed to avoid the resource curse; otherwise, Uganda could end up suffering from the Dutch Disease and Nigerian Disease, as has befallen other African countries.

Read the full text here.