Warning: Constant DISALLOW_FILE_EDIT already defined in /customers/3/2/f/landgovernance.org/httpd.www/wp-config.php on line 102 Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /customers/3/2/f/landgovernance.org/httpd.www/wp-config.php:102) in /customers/3/2/f/landgovernance.org/httpd.www/wp-content/plugins/onecom-vcache/vcaching.php on line 700 Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /customers/3/2/f/landgovernance.org/httpd.www/wp-config.php:102) in /customers/3/2/f/landgovernance.org/httpd.www/wp-content/plugins/onecom-vcache/vcaching.php on line 708 2014 Day-To-Day programme LANDac Summer School “Landegovernance for development” – LANDac
Princetonlaan 8a, 3584 CB, Utrecht landac.geo@uu.nl +31 30 253 13 63

2014 Day-To-Day programme LANDac Summer School “Landegovernance for development”

Now available: the 2014 day-to-day programme of the 5th LANDac Summer School
“Land governance for development”

Land is a priority issue in international development research, practice and policy making. Pressure on land is increasing, including for growing export and biofuel crops, as well as for speculation purposes, tourism, mining, industrial development, urbanization and nature conservation. As a result, access to and use of natural resources, particularly in developing countries, is being reshaped profoundly. Land governance in developing countries has to deal with multiple pressures and competing claims in ways that balance economic growth and social justice. This course provides a multidisciplinary analysis of the various dimensions of land governance in Africa, Asia, Latin America and beyond.

Large areas of agricultural land and forests are now being bought, leased or put into use by a broad range of stakeholders, including governments, foreign investors and international companies, but also local elites and conservation organizations. The targeted land is being used for growing export  and biofuel crops, as well as for speculation purposes, tourism, mining, industrial development, urbanization and nature conservation. Competing claims can have a significant impact on a country’s stability, as well as its ability to alleviate poverty, ensure food security and local livelihoods, preserve biodiversity, and arm communities with the tools and knowledge necessary for claiming their land rights. As a result, access to and use of land and natural resources, particularly in developing countries, is being reshaped profoundly. And land governance in developing countries now has to deal with multiple pressures and competing claims in ways that balance economic growth and social justice.

This course, organized by LANDac (the Netherlands Academy for Land Governance), will provide a multidisciplinary analysis of the various dimensions of land governance in Africa, Asia, Latin America and beyond. MSc students, PhD students and professionals from development organizations and projects will acquire up-to-date knowledge on new land pressures and learn how to place these in broader theoretical contexts and policy debates. Participants learn about best practices in land governance from different perspectives and on multiple levels, from local to international. Topics are discussed in interactive mini-courses, lectures and solution-oriented workshops and are complemented with a one-day excursion led by a development expert. The design of the course allows for participants to closely work together with professionals, experts and fellow students from a variety of backgrounds.

Several lectures draw a general overview of various important themes such as the global land rush, land governance, land administration and land issues in post-conflict situations. This overview is complemented by a mix of case studies that illustrate general issues and trends in specific contexts, including (trans)national land investments in Indonesia and the Philippines, government-led land acquisition and resettlement policies in India, and World Bank policies on land. But also looking at foreigners buying real estate for residential tourism in Costa Rica, land governance solutions in countries with weak institutions such as Burkina Faso, challenges for participatory land governance in Mozambique, and coping with urban pressures on agricultural land in Vietnam. Topics are discussed from a range of perspectives, blending insights from Dutch and international academics with those of development practitioners, representatives of farmers’ organizations and government policy advisors.

Target group:
The course is designed for Master’s students, PhD students, academics; as well as for practitioners from development organizations, projects and governments who are interested in or work in the fields of land governance, development studies, natural resource management, planning, human rights and conflict studies.

Course aim:
The course provides participants with thorough knowledge of current problems as well as academic and policy debates related to land and development. Participants also build understanding of practical knowledge and possible solutions. The guiding question is how to optimize the link between land governance, inclusive sustainable development and poverty alleviation.

Access the day-to-day programme 2014
More information: Utrecht Summer School